Hydrodynamic cavitation efficiently inactivates potato virus Y in water

date: 31.12.2021

category: Sporočila za javnost

 

In the scope of ERC CABUM project, the Laboratory for Water and Turbine Machines (LVTS) has together with the National Institute for Biology for the first time investigated the efficiency of hydrodynamic cavitation for inactivation of Potato virus Y (PVY). Results of the study, published in the renowned cavitation journal Ultrasonics Sonochemistry (IF: 7.491), showed that hydrodynamic cavitation can successfully inactivate the PVY virus. 

For many clean water is becoming a luxury they cannot afford anymore. To try and prevent its shortages, reuse of wastewater presents a viable option. The problem however is that such water contains various contaminants. We have to be aware that besides toxic compounds, water can also be a source and transmission route for pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The spread of waterborne viruses is especially problematic when contaminated water is reused in agriculture without proper disinfection. Besides causing high crop and financial losses they can also lead to food shortages. To prevent the risk of virus transmission, irrigation water must be properly treated beforehand. Novel environmentally friendly and highly efficient technologies are therefore in demand. In the scope of ERC CABUM project, the Laboratory for Water and Turbine Machines (LVTS) has together with the National Institute for Biology for the first time investigated the efficiency of hydrodynamic cavitation for inactivation of Potato virus Y (PVY). Results of the study, published in the renowned cavitation journal Ultrasonics Sonochemistry (IF: 7.491), showed that hydrodynamic cavitation can successfully inactivate the PVY virus. We concluded that the damage to the protein capsid occurs more rapidly and severely than the damage to the genomic RNA, and therefore plays a leading role in PVY inactivation. Furthermore, strong oxidants, that form in situ during cavitation, were not involved in virus inactivation, suggesting extreme mechanical effects arising in the microenvironment around the collapsing bubbles, were the culprit. This pioneering study, the first to investigate eukaryotic virus inactivation by cavitation, will inspire additional research in this field and serve for further improvement of cavitation as a water decontamination technology.

Web link to the article: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2021.105898.

Hidrodinamska kavitacija

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